22nd October 2014

Photo reblogged from Genderforkr with 5,038 notes

houseofalexzander:

From my broad shoulders, all the way down to the tip of my size 11 feet. Every detail about my body implies something. From my square chin to my lengthy legs. Every inch of my body implies something. From my flat chest to the occasional stubble upon the edge of my cheek. Every part of my body implies something.
Or at least… it was supposed to.
But time and time again, I have proven otherwise.
One can not choose the body in which they are born. But one can choose to take care of and style their body in a way that expresses who they are. The unfortunate part is that the mass majority is to busy chasing after beauty standards. Beauty standards that are constructed upon a gendered norm, of course.
Some tell me that I need to stop whining about it. They say that I’m just the odd ball and that the industry can’t recognize all the weird ones. They say I’m just the 1 out of 1,000,000. They say that clothes need to be gendered so that the people of society can understand the difference between the two genders. And to those of you who agree, I say that you’re missing the point.
Having two binary genders, complete with a separate social standard for each of the two binary genders, has lead our society to believe that there is a difference between the two, and there is not.
The broadness of your shoulder or the size of your feet does not determine your gender. Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society. The shape of your chin or the length of your legs does not determine your gender. Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society. The size of the breast on your chest or the amount of hair on your face does not determine your gender. Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society. Am I being clear?
Be who you are. Be yourself. Be you.
I don’t know how else to put it. Xoxo
-Elliott Alexzander

houseofalexzander:

From my broad shoulders, all the way down to the tip of my size 11 feet.
Every detail about my body implies something.
From my square chin to my lengthy legs.
Every inch of my body implies something.
From my flat chest to the occasional stubble upon the edge of my cheek.
Every part of my body implies something.

Or at least… it was supposed to.

But time and time again, I have proven otherwise.

One can not choose the body in which they are born.
But one can choose to take care of and style their body in a way that expresses who they are. The unfortunate part is that the mass majority is to busy chasing after beauty standards.
Beauty standards that are constructed upon a gendered norm, of course.

Some tell me that I need to stop whining about it. They say that I’m just the odd ball and that the industry can’t recognize all the weird ones. They say I’m just the 1 out of 1,000,000. They say that clothes need to be gendered so that the people of society can understand the difference between the two genders. And to those of you who agree, I say that you’re missing the point.

Having two binary genders, complete with a separate social standard for each of the two binary genders, has lead our society to believe that there is a difference between the two, and there is not.

The broadness of your shoulder or the size of your feet does not determine your gender.
Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society.
The shape of your chin or the length of your legs does not determine your gender.
Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society.
The size of the breast on your chest or the amount of hair on your face does not determine your gender.
Your gender identity does not determine your place or role in society.
Am I being clear?

Be who you are.
Be yourself.
Be you.

I don’t know how else to put it.
Xoxo

-Elliott Alexzander

Source: houseofalexzander

22nd October 2014

Photo reblogged from Field of Poppies with 99,581 notes

mockeryd:

Someone is bitter because they didn’t get that Ellie loving.

mockeryd:

Someone is bitter because they didn’t get that Ellie loving.

Source: gouldenqueen

22nd October 2014

Photo reblogged from body positive zone with 3,658 notes

note-a-bear:


So not only was the Viola’s performance in the final scene of the episode incredibly raw, symbolic and real, but she actually pitched the idea herself.
I have so much respect for this woman.

YES VIOLA

note-a-bear:

So not only was the Viola’s performance in the final scene of the episode incredibly raw, symbolic and real, but she actually pitched the idea herself.

I have so much respect for this woman.

YES VIOLA

Source: wessygibbins

21st October 2014

Post reblogged from ANGRY WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED with 309,854 notes

jeankd:

beautifullyburnedxo:

sailordirtbag:

before you date a girl with a mental illness, remember: saying, “you’re beautiful” won’t balance the chemicals in her brain.

and don’t fucking say, “i’ll be here for you, no matter what,” if you don’t mean it.

don’t think you’re fixing her by saying, “i love you.” because you’re not

This needs more notes.

All of it, but mostly the bolded

Source: bonycat

21st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from ANGRY WOMEN OF COLOR UNITED with 2,295 notes

Deepika and Arjun respond to a reporter who claims that Deepika overreacted to TOI’s article on her cleavage. [x]

Source: baawri

21st October 2014

Photoset reblogged from RA Shina with 28,961 notes

exgynocraticgrrl:

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013) , former Robinson Edwards Professor Emerita of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Gerda Lerner (1920-2013)  Women and History (excerpt)
-- A Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove

Source: exgynocraticgrrl

21st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Field of Poppies with 11,905 notes

misandry-mermaid:

iseealittlesilhouettoofacat:

fucknosexistcostumes:

"The hyper-sexualization of little girls and their bodies, as a mother, really bothers me. It plays into the sexualization of their bodies into their teenager years and adult life. It makes them grow up faster than they need to. Let them be little girls, have fun, be able to play in the playground and not worry about going on the monkey bars because someone’s going to see their underwear. Something like this constricts their movements, which affects the way they play."Jenny Reid, a volunteer firefighter with Langford Fire Rescue, says the costume is not only offensive to women in her field, it’s also damaging to the self-esteem of little girls.
"That costume is awful and it sends the wrong message," she says. "It reinforces that there are still jobs that are off-limits to women. It’s not a representation of the real job. Little girls can do whatever they want. They shouldn’t be restricted. Those types of costumes put so many limitations on them. They don’t build the self-esteem and confidence you need to be a firefighter or police officer." " [x]

I don’t know why there can’t just be one unisex costume for little kids. When I was little and wanted to dress like a dinosaur, I wanted to look like a dinosaur, not wear some frilly little dress with a picture of a T-Rex on it.It’s like even on Halloween when you’re told that you can be whatever you want, little girls are still given the message that they have to abide by society’s standards of what’s for girls and how girls “should” look. They’re costumes of police officers and firefighters aren’t taken seriously so they subconsciously learn that they won’t be taken seriously in those career fields so why bother. They’re just an ornament for decoration

Studies show that gendered marketing sells more products, because a person who associates a product as being specifically catered to them personally will be more interested in it. It’s disgusting that these sexist double standards exist for small kids, and the adults who make these products and the parents who purchase them are both to blame for it.

misandry-mermaid:

iseealittlesilhouettoofacat:

fucknosexistcostumes:

"The hyper-sexualization of little girls and their bodies, as a mother, really bothers me. It plays into the sexualization of their bodies into their teenager years and adult life. It makes them grow up faster than they need to. Let them be little girls, have fun, be able to play in the playground and not worry about going on the monkey bars because someone’s going to see their underwear. Something like this constricts their movements, which affects the way they play."

Jenny Reid, a volunteer firefighter with Langford Fire Rescue, says the costume is not only offensive to women in her field, it’s also damaging to the self-esteem of little girls.

"That costume is awful and it sends the wrong message," she says. "It reinforces that there are still jobs that are off-limits to women. It’s not a representation of the real job. Little girls can do whatever they want. They shouldn’t be restricted. Those types of costumes put so many limitations on them. They don’t build the self-esteem and confidence you need to be a firefighter or police officer." " [x]

I don’t know why there can’t just be one unisex costume for little kids. When I was little and wanted to dress like a dinosaur, I wanted to look like a dinosaur, not wear some frilly little dress with a picture of a T-Rex on it.
It’s like even on Halloween when you’re told that you can be whatever you want, little girls are still given the message that they have to abide by society’s standards of what’s for girls and how girls “should” look. They’re costumes of police officers and firefighters aren’t taken seriously so they subconsciously learn that they won’t be taken seriously in those career fields so why bother. They’re just an ornament for decoration

Studies show that gendered marketing sells more products, because a person who associates a product as being specifically catered to them personally will be more interested in it. It’s disgusting that these sexist double standards exist for small kids, and the adults who make these products and the parents who purchase them are both to blame for it.

Source: fucknosexistcostumes

21st October 2014

Post reblogged from I was cursed with poetry very young with 207,330 notes

My favorite Disney princess is Elizabeth Swann because rather than becoming a princess, she was like “nah, fuck that” and became a king instead.

cassbones:

carry-on-my-otp:

hangthecode:

image

a fucking pirate king at that

And it’s awesome because she started as this fucking proper Lady who was expected to marry a wealthy and accomplished, but one she did not love, but instead fell for the blacksmith and became a pirate, fucking shit up and taking names.

And she rocked every fucking second of her story, from Lady to Pirate King.

Source: hangthecode

21st October 2014

Photo reblogged from Evolution Of A Queen with 8,398 notes

dynastylnoire:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Things Are About To Go To Hell Again in Ferguson: Working to confirm the information above. When I get confirmation, I will give it. No matter what, please stay safe in Ferguson this week, especially tomorrow. [Source]

OMG

dynastylnoire:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Things Are About To Go To Hell Again in Ferguson: Working to confirm the information above. When I get confirmation, I will give it. No matter what, please stay safe in Ferguson this week, especially tomorrow. [Source]

OMG

Source: thepoliticalfreakshow

21st October 2014

Quote reblogged from Evolution Of A Queen with 472 notes

The idea that women should ‘experiment’ and perform sex acts that they do not want to has become a popular model for women’s sexual behaviour in heterosexual relationships since the ‘sexual revolution’ of the 1960s. It is an idea frequently reinforced and legitimated through sex therapy (see Jeffreys, 1990). Women are still encouraged by therapists to sexually fulfill their male partners, even if they have no desire to do so, or experience pain or discomfort (Tyler, 2008). For example, in the widely recommended self-help manual for women Becoming Orgasmic, therapists Heiman and LoPiccolo encourage women to try anal sex (an increasingly ubiquitous sex practice in pornography) if a male partner is interested in it. The advice from the therapists is: “If any discomfort does occur, try again some other time” (Heiman and LoPiccolo, 1992, p. 187). The central premise is that pain and discomfort for women are not acceptable reasons for discontinuing a sexual practice, but, rather, are reasons for women to undergo further ‘training’, ‘modelling’ and coercion. Instead of understanding that using pornography as a coercive strategy is harmful, sexologists extol pornography’s virtues, stating for example that it is useful for “giving the viewer permission to model the behavior” (Striar and Bartlik, 1999, p. 61).

Exactly what type of behaviour women are expected to model from pornography further exposes the way in which the promotion and legitimation of pornography in sex therapy poses harms to women’s equality. Even at the most respectable end of therapist-recommended pornography, sadomasochistic practices and acts such as double penetration, or DP as it is known in the porn industry, can be easily found. Take for example, the Sinclair Intimacy Institute, run by a “well known and respected sexologist, Dr Mark Schoen” (Black, 2006, p. 117). It consists mainly of an online store that sells therapist-recommended pornography. On the Institute’s Website, customers are assured that the pornography available is reviewed and approved by therapists who choose only “high quality sex positive productions” (Sinclair Intimacy Institute, 2007a, n.p.). Among the list of “sex positive productions” are the mainstream pornography titles The New Devil in Miss Jones, Jenna Loves Pain, and Deepthroat.

The choice of Deepthroat is particularly revealing given the amount of publicity surrounding the circumstances of its production. Linda Marchiano (Linda Lovelace at the time of filming) detailed her extensive abuse at the hands of her husband and pimp in her book Ordeal, explaining how she was forced, sometimes at gun point to perform in pornography (Lovelace, 1980). She once stated that: “every time someone watches that film, they are watching me being raped” (quoted in Dworkin, 1981). That such a film is labelled ‘sex positive’ by therapists should be serious cause for concern. But Deepthroat is not an isolated case.

Source: exgynocraticgrrl